Pink Christmas trees are this year's holiday decorating trend

PHOTO: Pink Christmas trees from Wayfair.com are pictured here.PlayWayfair.com
WATCH Pink Christmas trees a hot holiday trend

Pink is the new black when it comes to a hot holiday trend this Christmas season.

While black Christmas trees were the unlikely trend-setters last year, pink Christmas trees are being heralded as this year's holiday must-have.

Searches for pink Christmas trees are up 125% on Wayfair.com compared to the same time period in 2018, the home furnishings company told "Good Morning America."

The popularity this year of the colorful trees is attributed by Wayfair to the popularity of the blush or delicate shade of pink that has come to be known as millennial pink and seen in everything from restaurants to runways.

Pantone's 2019 color of the year is also a shade of pink, living coral, proving the color's hotness this year.

Pink is also just a fun pop of color and one that photographs well for the all-important Instagram post. The hashtag #PinkChristmasTree brings up more than 20,000 posts on Instagram.

One Wayfair customer explained in a review on the company's website that she chose a pink tree for a more personal reason.

"I was diagnosed with [breast cancer] earlier this year," she wrote. "After surgery and treatments, I am celebrating Cancer Free this Christmas! I purchased this pink tree as a symbol of being cancer free."

In addition to Wayfair, retail sites including Amazon, Walmart and Treetopia each have dozens of pink Christmas tree options.

Treetopia, an e-commerce site that sells artificial Christmas trees, reports a 33% increase in searches on its site for pink trees compared to last year.

Wayfair's options range in price from $24 to more than $300.

"Pink signals a refreshing air of celebration and adds an element of relaxed fun to any space. It's also unexpected for the holidays," a Wayfair spokesperson told "GMA." "We're so accustomed to the traditional tones of red, green and gold. Pink for holiday encourages people to put traditions aside and experiment with a color that's more unexpected."